Road Trip Checklist: Top 5 Tasks

If you are currently planning a road trip, or even just daydreaming about one, then this post is for you! Organizing travel can sometimes feel a little daunting, but preparing for a road trip is a special kind of hectic. Take your travel plans, then add a car into the mix, and you quadruple the “what if” factor. It’s far from an impossible feat though, and it doesn’t even have to be that stressful. People say the key to success is preparation, and this holds so true for travel, especially of the road trip variety. Below I have laid out the bare-bones list for the absolutely necessary tasks to complete before the pedal hits the metal. This is just the start for many, but if you, like me, can get easily overwhelmed by an excessive amount of tasks… then just start here.

1- Get your car serviced

If you ask me, the scariest part of a road trip is that I have a giant unpredictable hunk of steel tagging along when I am used to it just being me and a pack. There are so many things you can’t control out

Ready, Set, GO!

there on the road, but you can at least ensure that your vehicle is as prepared as possible for whatever comes your way. This means getting any outstanding mechanical work done, possibly a tune up, checking all the fluids, getting an oil change, and stocking your car with an emergency kit. Some great things to keep in your trunk are a can of Fix-a-flat, extra windshield wiping fluids, flashlight with batteries, a blanket, and reflective tape are a few things I personally like to keep in my car. If you aren’t driving, then get that car rented ASAP to get the best prices.

 

2- Budget

Don’t get caught with all your eggs in one basket!

Once you have all the crucial work completed on your car, then you can take a look at what’s left in your piggy bank… or wherever the kids keep their pocket change these days. Budgets do not have to be as detailed as you might think, especially if you aren’t on a super tight budget. I always round my costs up because it’s way better to be under budget than to run out of money on the road. The typical criteria for my budget is a daily food allowance, lodging allowance (I almost always stay with friends), expected gas expenses, souvenir allowance, and account for any specific activities you already know you want to do like rafting or city tours for example.

 

The actual allocation of funds will be different for everyone, but those are the 5 core elements to budget for. Typically my lodging, activities, and souvenir budget is almost zero, as I like to bring back just postcards and photographs, but I will research ahead of time to find the best local watering holes. The last two important aspects of a road trip budget are always having access to either a credit card or a savings just in case of an emergency, and accounting for any bills that will be withdrawn while you are away. Be careful not to double spend your money in the bank.

NOW FOR THE FUN PART!

3- Pick Core Stops

Got Georgia on your mind?

There are as many ways to plan a road trip as there are to… (Is there another colloquial phrase aside from the “skin a cat” saying, because that just freaks me out). Anyway! I think its best to first decide if you will do a loop, or rent a car one way and fly back. Either way, you need to pick some core stops, which are the places where you will absolutely be stopping. I am sure some of you are saying part of what makes road trips great is the spontaneity, and I agree. I usually only pick a few stops in cities where I know someone and plan to spend the night. It is important to factor in how much driving per day you realistically can do, and often that defines where your stops will be. So pull out that handy map, or hit up The Google and get excited!

4- Research Weather

Not too shabby…

My favorite! I get so excited to look up the weather in all my stops, especially if I am heading south. This is important beyond picking which swimsuit to pack, knowing the weather forecast is critical for planning out time. Be sure to give yourself extra time if you see the weather will be particularly bad. If you check the weather often before you leave and see rainy days ahead, you should have enough time to reroute a few of your stops… if you happen to be chasing the sun like myself.

 

5- Copy and Share Vital Documents

Once I am pretty much all set with my itinerary, I do this final step, which is far from least. It is really important to share your potential schedule with someone at home, even if it is a loose outline. I like to email a copy of my route and potential stops to my mom (I knoooow, but she is my BFF), and it helps that my loud mouth is forever on social media. In addition to my itinerary, I also make copies of my driver’s license, and I keep in my glovebox and another copy in my bag. This is also a great time to double-check you have current copies of your insurance and registration in your car. Lastly, be sure to write down contact info for a few people close to you and keep that in your car. I know with cell phones hardly anyone memorizes phone numbers anymore, so in the off-chance you need to make a call without your phone handy… a pen and paper might just be what saves your behind!

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6 Things to Expect When Traveling with your Sister!

I am known to travel alone, I love the experience of traveling solo and the freedom that comes with being entirely responsible for just yourself. Yet, when I do travel with someone, which is a rare case scenario, making the choice of travel partner is a serious task and not to be taken lightly. The only person who has survived the test of time, and traveled by my side more than once would be my lifelong partner in crime, my little sis. Having now taken two big trips with my little sister, I have some words of wisdom to share before you take the plunge into sister-travel! This will be helpful for any sister traveling, it doesn’t matter if you are the bossy-pants, overprotective, extremely prepared sibling, or if you are the easy-going but secretly sensitive, always trusting, party animal, usually younger sibling (Full disclosure: I am indeed that bossy-pants sister!).

 

1.You will want to wring her neck… at least once, ok maybe twice.

I am just going to jump right in the deep end with this one. There will come a time where she says lets go left and you say right, or she loses the hostel key, or gets too drunk, or gets scammed while changing your money and brings back way less colones than she should have (these are just hypotheticals of course). There is no way around the fact that most sisters piss each other off every once in a while, and no amount of miles between where you go and your home will change that fact. You will absolutely spend some of the trip not getting along, but how you deal with that conflict is key. You didn’t spend a bunch of money to travel halfway across the world (or even the next state over, for that matter) to do what you can do at your Nonna’s house over the holidays, save the arguing for Thanksgiving! Drop the argument like it’s hot, and get back to making memories!

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Save the drama for when you’re home with ya Mama!

2.Expect your parents to worry twice as much.

From my personal experience… moms are particularly prone to worrying. When I travel solo I don’t hear much from my mom, she only begins to worry after maybe a week or so without an update. Now put two of her babies far away in the same place, and for some reason the worrying begins to multiply. I swear there must be some type of mathematical formula, but the more children away together the more they want to hear from you! The best way to tackle this phenomenon, is to share the burden… I mean the blessing of caring parents 😉 Take turns updating your folks about what you are up to, and where you are headed next. One of the best ways is with photos, and that brings me to my next point…

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“You are going to hike a volca-what!”

3.Expect to take the silliest selfies!

One of the best things about traveling with your sister, is that she already knows how impossibly weird you are! No reason to hold back with her, you can be goofy and raw and real and she won’t be the least bit surprised. Usually discovering new places, and new people, you can feel reserved or filtered until you get your bearings, traveling with my sister is the only time I have felt free to be my silliest-self 100% of the time.

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Only with the sis…

4.There will be things you want to do, that she just isn’t into. 

No big deal! Actually this is a good thing. It is important, especially when traveling with someone you are so emotionally attached to, that you take some time to yourself. It doesn’t matter if you just spend a couple hours checking out an art museum while she sleeps in, or you take a weekend and go learn to scuba dive. Having a little bit of time to reflect alone is healthy for you both, so don’t worry if she doesn’t share every interest you have.

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Take some time to yourself!

5.Expect to share your clothes.

When I was younger, this was not my favorite thing about having a sister… lets get real, in high school it was my least favorite thing in the world! Yet, it never is going to change so eventually you give in… and release the vice grip on that adorable mini skirt you secretly wish she couldn’t fit, but she magically fits in everything you own no matter what size it is! If you haven’t learned to share with your sister yet, you will learn it on this trip. Actually traveling together was the first time I realized it was fun to share clothes with my sister, it instantly doubled my available outfit possibilities!

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All apparel compliments of “Olivia’s Suitcase”.

6.Finally, expect to laugh your ass off!

I laugh more than I do anywhere else I go, when I have my sister by my side. I love to travel, but I will be the first to tell you it is far from easy. Yet, with your sis along for the ride, all those slip-ups and bloopers you usually have to navigate alone, are nonstop fodder for the collection of “inside jokes” you will be able to share forever.

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Here is to those times all your photos come out blurry, because you just can’t stop laughing!

Thanks for reading! Comment below, and let us know any tips you have for traveling with family. Like, Follow, Share!

Peace and Safe Travels!

Olivia

 

 

Machu Picchu!! The Poor Man’s Adventure Trek.

As you might have already guessed, I enjoy the wilder side of things… and so when it came to visiting Machu Picchu I was on the search to find a more “exotic” route to take. Rather than the much traveled and quite pricey (but phenomenal and classic) Inca Trail, I booked the more economical Inca Jungle Trek. What not everyone knows is that there are actually two trails traveled by the Incas to get to Machu Picchu, well technically one wasn’t traveled by the “Inca” because Incas were actually just the royalty or ruling class. The commonly known trail is the route the royalty took to reach Machu Picchu, but the common people or Quechua people took a route through the Andean jungle. This isn’t a beautifully crafted stone walkway like the images conjured by the mention of the Inca Trail, it’s a winding overgrown footpath through the thick of the jungle. To go on this wild adventure with a tour company, there are usually 3 and 4 day options offered, but to do it as cheap as possible yet still have enough time to explore I chose a 5 day plan that was all walking and buses… rather than enjoying the comfort of taking the train. The first day consisted of a thrilling and slightly terrifying mountain bike ride down from a peak in the Andes into the jungle below, with the option to go whitewater rafting in the valley for an extra $30. The second day was a 6-8 hour hike straight up and over a mountain then ending the day in a natural hot springs. The next morning there was another $30 option to go zip-lining and then take a car to the town of Hydro Electrica, if you don’t go with that option you do save 30 bucks… but you have a 4 hour hike bright and early to get to Hydro Electrica in time to meet up with the zip-lining crew. After having lunch together at Hydro Electrica, everyone does the 3 hour hike along the train tracks to the town located below Machu Picchu, Aguas Calientes (or as it is now being called… Machu Picchu Pueblo). The next morning at 5am pretty much the entire town begins the 2,000-step climb to the top. Once at Machu Picchu, halfway through the day most people doing the jungle trek have to leave and hike the 3 hours back to Hydro Electrica in order to catch their 3pm bus to Cusco, the lucky ones take the train that night. I didn’t want to sacrifice a second of sunshine at the top, and I could barely walk after 4 days of hiking nonstop, so I spent one extra night in Aguas Calientes and slept in before my 3 hour hike to catch my 6 hour bus back to Cusco. I went on this incredible trip my last week in Peru with the last of my funds… and so I opted for the most basic plan, which was mountain biking, hiking, hot springs, and a visit to Machu Picchu!! The company I used was called Aita Peru, the woman running it was amazing and thorough… tailoring the trip to the individual needs of every person (I highly recommend them as I shopped around a lot beforehand and was so happy with my decision). I couldn’t have asked for a more adventurous, inspiring, and motivating end to my journey through Peru.

The bike ride was by far the most adrenaline-junkie part of the trek. We got all geared up and then went barreling down a mountain road for two and a half hours. My heart would feel like it was going to explode every time I was passed by a bus or construction vehicle while making a hairline turn on one of the many switch backs. Starting up at 4,000 m above sea level where I had wished I put another layer on under the odd “biker” jacket we were supplied with, we ended the ride in the valley surrounded by lush jungle and I couldn’t wait to strip down to my tank top. The most amazing part for me (being more of a naturalist than a crazy thrill chaser), was the incredible change in foliage over the 2.5 hour ride… and being able to see the way the plants have adapted to a completely different environment all on the same mountain!

All geared up and getting instructions on how NOT to die...

All geared up and getting instructions on how to NOT die…

The following day we set out on the toughest hike, up and over a mountain. During the hike we stopped at the Monkey House, which was a working coffee plantation where tours can stop for a break and learn about cacao, coffee, and coca. We marched on after that delightful break, over rickety bridges, back and forth along insanely narrow switchbacks, and ended in the hot springs!

Our guide Junior giving us a lesson on jungle crops.

Our guide Junior giving us a lesson on jungle crops.

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Yucca, fresh coffee beans, jungle liquors, cacao beans, and purple corn!

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Beautiful Valley!

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That silver bunch of buildings by my elbow… yeah I came from somewhere near there that morning. BAMF-status!

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My companions for those glorious 5 days.

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You see that red speck in the center of the photo?? That’s a person…

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Rickety Bridges… not for the weak of heart!

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Nothing like a bucket pulley over a raging river.

The third day only two of us opted out of zip-lining in the morning, and so we were each other’s hiking buddies for the first 4 hours of the day. Our guide stayed with the other six and drew us a crude map that looked like something you would follow to get to Narnia… “You go down this ladder, around the mountain, over this bridge… there will be a guard then blink twice say my name and you’ll be there”… ok not quite that weird but pretty close. It’s a shame the other 6 people got to take a car for this section of the trip because that 4 hour hike was truly beautiful! After lunching all together, we finished the day with a 3 hour walk along the train tracks to finally reach the town of Aguas Calientes.

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Gorgeous bridge in the valley surrounded by awe-inspiring mountains.

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Beautiful waterfalls showered the mountainsides.

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This is the first time my friend and I came across another hiker during those 4 hours…   can you spot the stranger-danger?? LOL

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Train tracks to Machu Picchu.

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As I was grumbling about the pain in my legs… getting this shot made me remember how good it is to be on foot instead of rushing past in a train.

The next morning at 5am, I pretended that every inch of my body was NOT in pain, and I jumped out of my bed like it was Christmas! I headed to the line and waited my turn at the bottom of Machu Picchu to get my ticket checked. When you look up it seems to be a sheer cliff face, and you can’t possibly imagine how anyone… let alone little asthmatic me… could get to the top. Then I did it! I hiked up those nearly vertical 2,000 steps huffing and puffing, but I made it!!

Waiting in the line at 5:30am to get let across the bridge to begin the hike up.

Waiting in the line at 5:30am to get let across the bridge to begin the hike up.

Hiking up 2,000 steps, and as the sun began to rise... it was so obvious how it was worth every bit of pain in my aching body!

Hiking up 2,000 steps, and as the sun began to rise… it was so obvious how it was worth every bit of pain in my aching body!

Beautiful steps made by the Quechua people for the Incas to reach Machu Picchu.

Beautiful steps made by the Quechua people, during the time of the Inca empire.

Finally up at the top and through the gates Machu Picchu is still clouded by the morning mist.

Finally up at the top and through the gates, Machu Picchu is still clouded by the morning mist.

Amazing doorways that have lasted the test of time.

Amazing doorways that have lasted the test of time.

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Before we went off to explore on our own, we walked around for 2 hours with a guide who explained the history of this incredible site.

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In all its splendor!

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The only building with a rounded wall… believed to be a temple of the sun.

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It is thought that this was an architectural design to keep Machu Picchu from sliding off the top of the mountain, but another theory is that they were used for agriculture… and some say these terraces were for both.

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“Don’t touch the ruins!” Im not touching… I’m thinking!

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Breathtaking!

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Machu Picchu… The Land Of #Selfies

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On top of the WORLD.

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Don’t forget me! The llamas at the Machu Picchu site are actually there to maintain the grass!

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Channeling the essence of the Picchu… actually I was fixing my hair for the pic, but meditating makes it seem like I’m making a much cooler face!

This was one of the most incredible things I have done in my life. I made memories and friends I get to keep forever by going through the amazing tour group Aita Peru, but I still had that time I need when I visit a place to sit and be with just myself. I like to say that when I travel I never “sight-see”… I commune. Machu Picchu proved to be one of those incredible places where as I stand in awe, my soul expands to connect with the land and I am forever changed… elevated and never to be the same.

Happy place! Happy face!

Happy place! Happy face!

Travel Tip of The Day!

Nothing like waking up to the sunrise from the airport floor! I love to travel and fortunately enough for me I honestly don’t mind red-eye flights or layovers sleeping on airport seats. The way I can travel so cheaply has a lot to do with the dirt cheap flights I find that have the worst layovers possible. Not everyone feels the way I do, and often times for travelers, getting there is by far the hardest part. For all those that fear the airport floor, there are a few things I always bring that make my airport stay a bit more comfortable. When my layovers are short I try to bring nothing more than a small bag, but traveling around the world requires something more substantial. I typically pack one carry on, and the easiest is by far a small backpack. If you are a backpacker then your 10-20 liter daypack will work great. To make my comfy airport bed I bring an eye mask, ear plugs, a small sweater, another sweater I use as a pillow, a lite weight sarong just to cover the seat or floor, and a small blanket (mine is actually an airplane blanket I “collected” a while ago). A book and headphones are critical, and I always bring a change of clothes (thin fabric to save space) and my toothbrush so I can arrive in a new place not feeling like I’m covered in thousands of other people’s germs. One last thing I bring that I don’t think is on most people’s airport list is peppermint oil, rubbing some on your tummy helps with nausea on the plane not to mention it smells a lot better than stale airplane air! Before I head out I often check tripadvisor for the restaurant ratings in the international wing to make my decision of where to eat easier when I’m starving and my legs are wobbly from sitting for 7 hours. If you are ever in the Bogotá airport, Orleans- American Bistro is pretty tasty… but aside from Tabasco there is nothing there that reminds me of New Orleans, that said their chowder is incredible. They also play great movies (on mute), and awesome 90s music videos at a reasonable volume during the day… at night you might mistake it for an empty discoteca. I hope this helps make it a little easier on those that loath the overnight flight, if you really need to save some bucks go for that dirt cheap flight with terrible hours and make the best of it. Happy Traveling!!

Bucket List Weekend – Chincha and El Carmen

The first stop on my journey was El Carmen, a tiny town in the district of Chincha known as the hotspot for all things Afro-Peruvian. The only way to get to this town is to go to Chincha and take a taxi or a much cheaper combi (also known as colectivos, these are cars or minivans that carry multiple people to a designated area for a very small set fee… aka the human tetris game. I took a combi from the airport and paid 4 soles ($1.50), rather than the taxi fee of 40 to 60 soles ($20), and I shared that ride in a minibus smaller than most SUVs… with 25 other people! That got me some serious “street-cred” with all my Peruvian friends). I got a rather late start to my day on Thursday, so I decided to take an afternoon bus to Chincha and tour El Carmen in the morning. My bus left Lima around 3pm and took about 2.5 hours, getting me there close to sunset. I went with the company Soyuz, which is a middle of the road quality bus, and it cost me 23 soles ($7.50).

About bus travel: I was all about taking the cheapest option and was planning to disregard my friend’s pleading for the contrary until, very unfortunately, shortly before my trip there was a tragic bus crash here in Peru resulting in the loss of 37 lives, apparently it is not an unusual event. The danger is not about the safety of your belongings, it’s about your life… and for that reason it was not worth the risk to go any cheaper on bus fare. That said, buses are absolutely the way to travel through most South American countries, just be wise about the company’s reputation for safety.

Chincha is not much of a “destination” it’s very busy and congested, and no matter what you do to not stick out… you will. I usually try to arrive in a new place well before sundown, especially if I have nothing booked as was the case with this trip (mom don’t freak out!), but I was cutting it pretty close. After a long bus ride I step off the bus to the typical onslaught of aggressive taxi drivers, brushing them off like I actually knew where I was going I continued out the station and onto the main road. I needed to figure out where the “centro” was, the central plaza of the town, usual the place to go if you have no idea where you are going. My “go to” lineup for people I ask to give me directions, in this order, are traffic police (which is absolutely an oxymoron in Peru), fruit vendors with the movable wagon stands, really old men, and women with children… trust me its fool-proof (despite the fact they are known for not liking to ask for directions, men are remarkably good at giving simple directions. Women on the other hand, tend to tell you the color of every house along the way and the name of all the stores on every corner you need to turn at… by the time they’re done I don’t even remember where the hell I wanted to go in the first place!). Also be sure to ask multiple people, if I am really lost I typically ask someone new every block to be safe. For example, someone tells me its 4 blocks away and I walk one block, ask again, and that person tells me its 6 blocks from there… not a huge concern at least the consensus is that it’s straight ahead… somewhere. Now, a crossing guard tells me its 4 blocks ahead and then a vendor tells me its 8 blocks to the left… that’s when I start looking for an old man.

After quite the walk, where miraculously I was almost run over ONLY twice, I reached the central plaza. Peru has the craziest traffic I have ever seen, hands down, it’s like every driver seeks to break every single traffic law known to man at least 30 times… every time they get behind the wheel! Unfortunately for me, the central plaza is under construction so not only are there no vendors or old men hanging around to give me directions but the giant wall of building material makes it impossible to see the other side… so I end up circling this plaza 3 times looking for a hostel before I decide it’s getting too dark and I need to get some help. I break my own rule and just ask the nearest person, who happens to be a young waiter at a restaurant just opening for dinner… apparently everyone working here is under the age of 20. “Do you know where there is a hostel named La Posado?” I ask, in Spanish of course… he stares at me as if I am literally starting to sprout a unicorn horn out of my forehead! “Do you know of any hostels nearby?”…again in Spanish of course, again with the unicorn-horn stare. Ok I am really regretting breaking my own rule at this point, I’m not fluent by any means but my Spanish is not THAT bad, you would think I was asking him where I could find a flying cow! Finally his face begins to look slightly less alarmed, and more pensive. “Si!” He tells me, and I can’t help but roll my eyes. “Aqui” He says as he points out the door. I quickly glance up and down the street not a hostel sign in sight… “aqui where?” I plead. “Aqui”, he reassured me, again with his finger pointing in some arbitrary direction now slightly to the left… “On the corner? On this street? How many blocks?” I ask in Spanish, frantically… his answer to all those questions is a very nonchalant “si” (apparently the teenage tendency toward monosyllabic answers is a global phenomenon…), and I give up, replying with a rather defeated “gracias”… Never again will I ask anyone under the age of 30 for directions… ever!

I finally track down La Posado hostel, after using a stranger’s computer to find that no address is posted online and then trying to follow obscure directions given by the owner after calling from a payphone. I got there and was told it costs 50 soles a night, with an incredulous look on my face I began to haggle it down (not that I really had another place to stay, but I have a really great poker face). I finally get her down to 40 soles ($13), and call it a win. They have wifi and it appears to be reasonably clean, then when she takes me to the room all the craziness becomes worth it. Fellow backpackers will know how hard it is to come by privacy when trying to travel cheaply, I personally have been sleeping on a couch since I arrived in Peru. The room had a glorious full size bed, and a private bathroom… not to mention cable with movies in English! HEAVEN. Needless to say, I slept like a baby!

Bright and early I hauled tail out of Chincha and got a colectivo into El Carmen. It was a short but beautiful ride of about 30 minutes, breaking away from the loud and restless Chincha. The enchanting yellow flowers of cotton plants line both sides of the dusty dirt road, mirroring the Afro-Peruvian culture of this area as it has also blossomed into something of incredible beauty after such painful beginnings. El Carmen is a sleepy little town, apparently slightly more animated on weekends and teaming with life for the Christmas holiday. The people were friendly and curious, everyone wanting to know where I was from. It’s interesting the comfort that comes when looking into faces that resemble yours, even though I someone who loves to explore new cultures and is often the only person who “looks like me” in the room… I still notice the comfort level and familiarity of others when I am around faces that physically resemble mine, even when they belong to a culture so different. It really made me ponder how alike we all are at the core; no matter our differences in language, skin tone, or features I believe we are getting closer to recognizing our global culture. A culture that respects and includes all, one that revels in cultural exchange rather than fearing it.

The people of El Carmen were all shades of brown, most are darker than the typical Peruvian, with the beauty of African genetics written all over their bodies and the familiar sound of Peruvian Spanish on their tongues. I found my way to the one location for information, a “tourist center”, which was really the living room of Guillermo’s house. Guillermo, the keeper of culture in El Carmen, welcomes travelers into his home to share the history, art, and culture of his people. Guillermo and his family were some of the warmest people I have ever met, and I sat for over 3 hours listening to him tell stories in Spanish of the African slaves brought to Peru, their revolutions, their reformations, and their cultural renaissance in the town of El Carmen. There are videos on my Instagram and Tumblr of Guillermo and his son playing the violin and the cajon, a percussion instrument found in Afro-Peruvian music.

I only wish I had been there when the resident zapateo teacher was in town, so that I could learn a few moves from one or two of the traditional dances. The zapateo is a dance reminiscent of tap-dancing, full of life and joy but the meanings of most songs and dances are of somber memories. Most of the dances and songs are written to recall the times of slavery, some even depicting dance moves symbolizing whippings and being shackled. The music, art, and food of El Carmen was all such a treat to experience, and the open hearts and doors that met me upon my arrival were what really made this place special. This was an amazing once in a lifetime experience, I highly recommend taking the time to make the short journey into El Carmen… especially if you are already on your way south.  

Next stop Paracas!

Bus: Soyuz Bus

Hostel: La Posado- listed in lonely planet

El Carmen: Tours El Carmen- on Facebook

Bucket List Weekend

This past weekend I took an amazing little trip to get away from the hustle and bustle of Lima. My adventure down the southern coast of Peru was the perfect combination of ecotourism, adventure sport, and cultural exploration. It was a simple and cheap experience I would recommend to everyone who travels through Lima, it would be a shame to miss out on these gems just south of the coastal hub often seen as the door to Peru. If these excursions were not on your “bucket list” before, after a look through a few photos from my trip they just might be! So that I’m not making an assumption about everyone reading this, if you have no idea what a bucket list is… it’s a list of things you want to do or see before you “kick the bucket” aka die… not sure exactly what bucket-kicking has to do with death, but yeah, if you know that half of the story educate the rest of us! Anyways, I digress… The coolest part of the trip was that I really had no idea where I was going or what I would be doing until right before, I love those spur of the moment spontaneous adventures.
I heard a few days prior about these awesome islands where you can see Humboldt penguins, and being a marine biologist by training I was sold! The following day, another friend told me of a trip they took in that same area where you can sand-board down giant dunes in the desert and overnight in an oasis, again… immediately sold. While researching those destinations, I discovered that this hidden gem of Afro-Peruvian culture, which was already on my list of things I couldn’t miss, was along that same route down the southern coast. When traveling for pure adventure, flexibility is something that can make or break your chances of seeing and experiencing things you have never even heard about. The following day I was on my way!
A few housekeeping notes before I get into the nitty-gritty of my journey south. This trip can be done on any budget, the one I describe here is a pretty meager backpacker’s budget. From start to finish including bus prices, hostel costs, food costs, the costs for a sand-boarding tour around the dunes, boat tour costs, the costs for national park fees, and a few treats… I did this trip for the equivalent of 300 soles ($100). With a little effort and maybe opting out of one of the more pricey excursions you could do this trip for even less, or you can opt for a luxury bus and resorts along the coast… haha either way you are bound to have a blast! I will be breaking the weekend up into 3 posts one for each place I visited, and for all my followers planning or dreaming of a trip to Peru in the near future, at the end of each post there will be links for a few recommended resources and informational sites.
And off we go…