6 Things to Expect When Traveling with your Sister!

I am known to travel alone, I love the experience of traveling solo and the freedom that comes with being entirely responsible for just yourself. Yet, when I do travel with someone, which is a rare case scenario, making the choice of travel partner is a serious task and not to be taken lightly. The only person who has survived the test of time, and traveled by my side more than once would be my lifelong partner in crime, my little sis. Having now taken two big trips with my little sister, I have some words of wisdom to share before you take the plunge into sister-travel! This will be helpful for any sister traveling, it doesn’t matter if you are the bossy-pants, overprotective, extremely prepared sibling, or if you are the easy-going but secretly sensitive, always trusting, party animal, usually younger sibling (Full disclosure: I am indeed that bossy-pants sister!).

 

1.You will want to wring her neck… at least once, ok maybe twice.

I am just going to jump right in the deep end with this one. There will come a time where she says lets go left and you say right, or she loses the hostel key, or gets too drunk, or gets scammed while changing your money and brings back way less colones than she should have (these are just hypotheticals of course). There is no way around the fact that most sisters piss each other off every once in a while, and no amount of miles between where you go and your home will change that fact. You will absolutely spend some of the trip not getting along, but how you deal with that conflict is key. You didn’t spend a bunch of money to travel halfway across the world (or even the next state over, for that matter) to do what you can do at your Nonna’s house over the holidays, save the arguing for Thanksgiving! Drop the argument like it’s hot, and get back to making memories!

10171006_10154124224465445_697949407374064461_n

Save the drama for when you’re home with ya Mama!

2.Expect your parents to worry twice as much.

From my personal experience… moms are particularly prone to worrying. When I travel solo I don’t hear much from my mom, she only begins to worry after maybe a week or so without an update. Now put two of her babies far away in the same place, and for some reason the worrying begins to multiply. I swear there must be some type of mathematical formula, but the more children away together the more they want to hear from you! The best way to tackle this phenomenon, is to share the burden… I mean the blessing of caring parents 😉 Take turns updating your folks about what you are up to, and where you are headed next. One of the best ways is with photos, and that brings me to my next point…

1480738_10154124202845445_2074795455297974048_n

“You are going to hike a volca-what!”

3.Expect to take the silliest selfies!

One of the best things about traveling with your sister, is that she already knows how impossibly weird you are! No reason to hold back with her, you can be goofy and raw and real and she won’t be the least bit surprised. Usually discovering new places, and new people, you can feel reserved or filtered until you get your bearings, traveling with my sister is the only time I have felt free to be my silliest-self 100% of the time.

IMG_3390 (2)

Only with the sis…

4.There will be things you want to do, that she just isn’t into. 

No big deal! Actually this is a good thing. It is important, especially when traveling with someone you are so emotionally attached to, that you take some time to yourself. It doesn’t matter if you just spend a couple hours checking out an art museum while she sleeps in, or you take a weekend and go learn to scuba dive. Having a little bit of time to reflect alone is healthy for you both, so don’t worry if she doesn’t share every interest you have.

IMG_3523

Take some time to yourself!

5.Expect to share your clothes.

When I was younger, this was not my favorite thing about having a sister… lets get real, in high school it was my least favorite thing in the world! Yet, it never is going to change so eventually you give in… and release the vice grip on that adorable mini skirt you secretly wish she couldn’t fit, but she magically fits in everything you own no matter what size it is! If you haven’t learned to share with your sister yet, you will learn it on this trip. Actually traveling together was the first time I realized it was fun to share clothes with my sister, it instantly doubled my available outfit possibilities!

IMG_3395

All apparel compliments of “Olivia’s Suitcase”.

6.Finally, expect to laugh your ass off!

I laugh more than I do anywhere else I go, when I have my sister by my side. I love to travel, but I will be the first to tell you it is far from easy. Yet, with your sis along for the ride, all those slip-ups and bloopers you usually have to navigate alone, are nonstop fodder for the collection of “inside jokes” you will be able to share forever.

IMG_5177_2 (3)

Here is to those times all your photos come out blurry, because you just can’t stop laughing!

Thanks for reading! Comment below, and let us know any tips you have for traveling with family. Like, Follow, Share!

Peace and Safe Travels!

Olivia

 

 

Robben Island

Two years and two days ago was a very sad moment in history for South Africa, and the global community. The country of South Africa lost a national hero, and the world lost one of the greatest defenders of justice and equality. On December 5th 2013 Nelson Mandela left this physical world. Yesterday, I was exceptionally lucky to get the chance to memorialize this date with a trip to Robben Island. Robben Island is the site of the prison where former President of South Africa Nelson Mandela, and many other political prisoners were held. Many of them were peaceful fighters for freedom from oppression, and almost all of them were unjustly held without any formal charges or a trial.

I was prepared for this experience to be a powerful and deeply saddening tour, because of how horrific the crimes against human rights were during apartheid. I was not prepared for the fact that all the guides were former prisoners. The painful history was real and alive in their eyes. I think hearing it straight from the victims of this brutal system, helped even the furthest removed from this type of oppression to connect with the gravity of this moment in a more personal way. 

Former prisoner on Robben Island, and my amazing guide

 

The first guide we had gave us a rundown of the basic history of apartheid, the history of the island (it was previously a colony for outcast lepers), and the first political prisoners to be sent to the island. In the 1960s, the leader of a peaceful protest called people to burn their ID documents used to control the black and coloured people of South Africa, this resulted in a horrific massacre leaving 69 people dead. (Although I have a sick guttural reaction to the word coloured, being a Black American, it is widely used in SA to this day, and simply means person of mixed race.) The man who led this protest, Robert Sobukwe, was one of the first political prisoners on the island. He was held in a small house alone for 3 years, no one was allowed to visit and no guards were to speak with him. Once his time was served he was arrested onsite before he ever left the island and was given another 3 years, and eventually allowed one letter OR visit every 6 months. Sobukwe was never charged for a second or third offense although he was detained twice after being released, and then put on house arrest until his death. This was the beginning of the “Sobukwe Clause”, which states the government of SA can arrest and detain anyone without cause or trial.

Different meals for prisoners of different races

This clause was the way in which the government justified their round up of all the anti-apartheid leaders fighting for equality and justice. The leaders were all kept in the same prison, in single cells, without running water and exposed to the elements with only bars (no glass windows or doors) until the late 70s, when windows and showers were added to the building. The leaders were also forced to work in a limestone quarry leading to many fatal illnesses, such as cancer and infections. Their only means to gain more privileges were long and painful hunger strikes. Seeing and hearing first hand about these horrific inequalities infuriated me, and spoke to a part of my heritage during slavery, then segregation, and the current state of racial profiling and attacks. All this weighed so heavy on my soul, and I felt the pain that had saturated Robben Island and lingered still.

Photographing Nelson Mandela’s cell

Then came hope, we learned that as much as they attempted to separate, dehumanize, and kill the spirits of their prisoners… There was an aspect of apartheid rule that came to be the prisoner’s saving grace. During apartheid all was separate, which means wherever the prisoners were to “relieve themselves” was a black toilet, and no white guards were to enter. While in the prison they all had buckets in their cells, but out at the quarry while they endured hard labor, they were forced to go to the bathroom in a cave. This cave, affectionately referred to as “The Parliament” was where a new South Africa was born. All the fighters for justice shared ideas and strategies in that cave, they thought not of the present but the future, and many of their goals for justice can be found in the South African constitution of today. From this atrocity, blossomed the beautiful philosophy of “Each one, Teach one”.

This experience is something that will always be with me in my heart and on my mind. It was a heavy part of my journey, it led me to think more on my “place” in my own country, my “place” as a brown person in this world, and how far we as a globe have to go before we see real equality in every corner, and that wound of past atrocities against our basic rights as humans isn’t festering still. I feel for South Africa and they, like my own country and many others, have a long way to go before equality and justice are the true law of the land. Everyday we can get closer, and the key to reaching that dream of global peace is the education of the future generation, I believe that with all my heart. If we take the goal of peace and equality, and then “Each One, Teach One”… we will get there, in every corner of the globe.

 

 

 

Onward to South Africa!!

After a refreshing mile long jog (after landing just 10 minutes before my flight
4 terminals away started boarding), I am on my plane to #johannesburg #southafrica So tired but so excited!!  

 Traveling is real life and so far from easy. I just sat down and there is a faint lingering smell of vomit not cleaned well enough… And literally 5 children under the age of 10 just sat behind me with only 2 adults. One is already pinching her brother, and another kicking my seat #curseofateacher This is going to be a very long flight and will surely test me… Thank goodness for sleepy time pills 😉 These kinda #nomadstruggles remind me of @pinthemapproject ‘s recent post on sharing the “real life” side of travel. That’s just what I plan to do! Expect regular updates from the field, reporting back soon, now for some sleep!   

 All there is left to do is tune out the little one whining behind me for an iPad, who I just gave the evil eye and told to stop banging on my seat 🙂 haha. Totally the curse of a preschool teacher, I love them… But do the really have to follow me everywhere??

More shortly,

Olivia, Olive, Lala 

Bucket List Weekend

This past weekend I took an amazing little trip to get away from the hustle and bustle of Lima. My adventure down the southern coast of Peru was the perfect combination of ecotourism, adventure sport, and cultural exploration. It was a simple and cheap experience I would recommend to everyone who travels through Lima, it would be a shame to miss out on these gems just south of the coastal hub often seen as the door to Peru. If these excursions were not on your “bucket list” before, after a look through a few photos from my trip they just might be! So that I’m not making an assumption about everyone reading this, if you have no idea what a bucket list is… it’s a list of things you want to do or see before you “kick the bucket” aka die… not sure exactly what bucket-kicking has to do with death, but yeah, if you know that half of the story educate the rest of us! Anyways, I digress… The coolest part of the trip was that I really had no idea where I was going or what I would be doing until right before, I love those spur of the moment spontaneous adventures.
I heard a few days prior about these awesome islands where you can see Humboldt penguins, and being a marine biologist by training I was sold! The following day, another friend told me of a trip they took in that same area where you can sand-board down giant dunes in the desert and overnight in an oasis, again… immediately sold. While researching those destinations, I discovered that this hidden gem of Afro-Peruvian culture, which was already on my list of things I couldn’t miss, was along that same route down the southern coast. When traveling for pure adventure, flexibility is something that can make or break your chances of seeing and experiencing things you have never even heard about. The following day I was on my way!
A few housekeeping notes before I get into the nitty-gritty of my journey south. This trip can be done on any budget, the one I describe here is a pretty meager backpacker’s budget. From start to finish including bus prices, hostel costs, food costs, the costs for a sand-boarding tour around the dunes, boat tour costs, the costs for national park fees, and a few treats… I did this trip for the equivalent of 300 soles ($100). With a little effort and maybe opting out of one of the more pricey excursions you could do this trip for even less, or you can opt for a luxury bus and resorts along the coast… haha either way you are bound to have a blast! I will be breaking the weekend up into 3 posts one for each place I visited, and for all my followers planning or dreaming of a trip to Peru in the near future, at the end of each post there will be links for a few recommended resources and informational sites.
And off we go…